The Daily Record Recognizes Miller, Miller & Canby on Maryland’s Largest Law Firms 2019


Miller, Miller & Canby has been recognized as a Top 50 firm in the The Daily Record’s Maryland’s Largest Law Firms 2019, an annual compilation that ranks law firms in the state by size.  “We are always honored to be included in The Daily Record’s list,” said firm managing shareholder Robert Gough, and added "We take great pride in the fact that we have been doing business in the state of Maryland for more than 70 years.”
 
The Daily Record is a multimedia news source, publishing a print and online edition, and focusing on news in law, business and government. It publishes special products, which include Largest Law Firms and Doing Business in Maryland and also honors leading Marylanders through awards that include  Influential Marylanders and Most Admired CEOs. View article.
 
To learn more about Miller, Miller & Canby’s history in the state of Maryland and practice areas, please visit www.millermillercanby.com.
 





Should Maryland Commercial Property Owners Complete Tax Questionnaires?


Every year, the Maryland Department of Assessments and Taxation (SDAT) is tasked with reassessing one-third of all commercial properties in the state.  In the year prior to the reassessment, SDAT is required to obtain income and expense information from the property owner.  The information allows the assessor to determine the value of the property using an income approach.  This approach determines value by taking gross income (e.g., rent, CAM reimbursements and other income), applying a vacancy rate and deducting property-related expenses such as maintenance, repairs, utilities, insurance, professional fees (attorney or accountant) and management fees.  The resulting net operating income (NOI) is then divided by an appropriate capitalization rate to reach a final value.

Types of SDAT Property Questionnaires
There are several different types of questionnaires issued by SDAT, each tailored to the type of property being reassessed.  These include apartments, hotels, assisted living facilities, nursing homes, cemeteries, garages and parking lots, mobile home parks, marinas, golf courses and commercial/industrial properties.  The owner is asked to complete the questionnaire and return it to the local Assessment Office by May 15.  

Are Property Tax Questionnaire Submissions Mandatory?
Property owners often inquire whether the submission of the questionnaire is mandatory, and what happens if the questionnaire is not returned.  The answer depends upon the value of the property.  For income-producing property that has a value in excess of $5,000,000, as listed on the assessment roll, the owner is subject to a statutory penalty for failing to produce the information.  The penalty is $100 per day up to a maximum equal to 0.1% of the value of the property.  For instance, a property assessed at $6,000,000 would be subject to a penalty up to $6,000 for the failure to submit the competed questionnaire.

Despite the statutory mandate, there can be instances where the property owner would rather incur a penalty than submit income and expense information to SDAT.  A classic example is where the property is under-assessed by a large margin and submission of the income information would likely cause a significant increase in the assessment. Conversely, a property owner who is not required to submit a questionnaire might want to do so in certain situations. In this instance, the property may be over-assessed and the income and expense information will educate the assessor and likely lead to a reduction in the assessment.

What Should Owner-Occupied Properties Submit?
For properties that are owner-occupied, there is no stream of rental income to report to SDAT.  In this situation, the owner should return the questionnaire without inserting the income and expense data and simply note: “Owner-Occupied.”  The Assessment Office will then estimate market rent and expenses in order to conduct an income approach to value. Occasionally, an owner will have a “friendly lease” with itself or a closely related entity that holds title to the property.  Since this is not an arms-length lease, the rental income should not be reported on the questionnaire because it is unlikely to reflect fair market rent.

Miller, Miller & Canby has been challenging the assessments of various types of properties in Maryland for more than 30 years and has obtained substantial reductions in real property assessments for our clients. We have successfully appealed the assessments on office buildings, retail stores, senior living centers, warehouses, industrial sites, casinos, apartment buildings, golf courses and cemeteries.  

Michael Campbell
is a partner in the litigation group at Miller, Miller & Canby.  In addition to trial and appellate advocacy, his practice focuses on real estate litigation and property tax assessment appeals.  Please feel free to contact Mr. Campbell at 301.762.5212 or send him an email for property tax guidance or to help reduce your commercial Maryland property tax assessment.  For more information about the firm’s Maryland property tax appeals practice and representative cases, click here.





MM&C Litigation Attorney Joseph Suntum Selected as Board Member of Owners’ Counsel of America


Miller, Miller & Canby litigation attorney, Joseph (Joe) Suntum, was nominated and selected as one of three new Board Members of Owners’ Counsel of America (OCA) for 2019.

"I have known all three of these individuals for a long time," says OCA Executive Director Leslie Fields, "and I am confident they will bring a tremendous amount of energy and enthusiasm to the task of leading this great organization."

Click here
to read the March 6, 2019 press release by The Owners' Counsel of America.

Joe Suntum
is a principal with Miller, Miller & Canby and leads the firm’s Eminent Domain and Condemnation Group. His decades of trial experience and his in-depth knowledge of real property valuation and the law of eminent domain allow him to protect his clients’ property rights and maximize compensation for his clients when their properties are targeted for condemnation. Mr. Suntum speaks regularly on issues pertaining to eminent domain practice. He is the Owners’ Counsel of America (OCA) member attorney for the State of Maryland. Membership in the OCA, a national network of experienced condemnation attorneys who represent property owners in federal, state and local condemnation proceedings, is restricted to only one member attorney per state.

U.S. News - Best Lawyers awarded Miller, Miller & Canby a “First-Tier” honor for its Eminent Domain and Condemnation practice. For information about Miller, Miller & Canby’s eminent domain and condemnation practice click here, or contact Mr. Suntum directly at 301.762.5212 or via email.





Donna E. McBride Admitted to American College of Trial Lawyers


Miller, Miller & Canby’s Donna McBride has become a Fellow of the American College of Trial Lawyers, one of the premier legal associations in North America.

The induction ceremony at which Ms. McBride became a Fellow took place on March 2nd before an audience of 570 during the recent Induction Ceremony at the 2019 Spring Meeting of the College in La Quinta, California. The meeting had a total attendance of 750.

Founded in 1950, the College is composed of the best of the trial bar from the United States and Canada. Fellowship in the College is extended by invitation only and only after careful investigation, to those experienced trial lawyers of diverse backgrounds, who have mastered the art of advocacy and whose professional careers have been marked by the highest standards of ethical conduct, professionalism, civility and collegiality. Lawyers must have a minimum of fifteen years trial experience before they can be considered for Fellowship.

Membership in the College cannot exceed one percent of the total lawyer population of any state or province. There are currently approximately 5,800 members in the United States and Canada, including active Fellows, Emeritus Fellows, Judicial Fellows (those who ascended to the bench after their induction) and Honorary Fellows. The College maintains and seeks to improve the standards of trial practice, professionalism, ethics, and the administration of justice through education and public statements on independence of the judiciary, trial by jury, respect for the rule of law, access to justice, and fair and just representation of all parties to legal proceedings. The College is thus able to speak with a balanced voice on important issues affecting the legal profession and the administration of justice.

Donna McBride
is a partner in Miller, Miller & Canby’s Litigation group, with a trial practice that is diverse and extensive. In her more than two decades of practice, she has tried hundreds of lawsuits throughout the state of Maryland and in the District of Columbia.

In addition to her background as a trial lawyer, Ms. McBride is a member of the Court of Appeals Standing Committee of Rules of Practice and Procedure, where she was appointed to serve a second 5-year term beginning in 2018. She is also a member of the Trial Court's Judicial Nominating Commission, the Montgomery County Inn of Court, a former co-chair and current member of the Maryland State Bar Association's Judicial Selections Committee and has volunteered as a mediator for the District Court since 2008. In 2018, she was elected to serve as Treasurer for the Montgomery County Bar Association, to serve the 2018-2019 term.

The newly inducted Fellow is an alumna of the American University Washington College of Law.

For more information about Donna McBride and Miller, Miller & Canby’s Litigation practice click here. View the firm press release by clicking the Download button below.
 





Democratic Congressional Leaders Accuse FCC of Collusion in Small Cell Ruling


In a letter to FCC Chairman Ajit Pai dated January 24, 2019, the heads of the House Energy and Commerce Committee and the Subcommittee on Communications and Technology accused the agency of colluding with telecom companies to win court approval for a ruling that limits fees and approval processes for small cell deployments. Click here to view the letter.

When the FCC approved the rule change in September 2018, it was positioned as a necessary step to meet the needs of 5G and speed up the deployment of small cells and other telecom equipment. Regulators limited the fees that cities and states can charge for small cell installations and set reduced timelines for the approval process.

Cities must now act on applications within 60-90 days and can only charge a $100 application fee and an annual $270 fee per small cell. The move drew criticism from local officials who believe the FCC overstepped its authority, and many continue to call for an appeal or outright reversal of the ruling.

As discussed in previous MM&C articles on this topic, many local governments have combined forces to appeal the FCC Order. The U.S. Court of Appeals for the 10th Circuit denied the cities’ request for a stay, the FCC’s Declaratory Ruling and Third Report and Order on small cell deployment went into effect on January 15, 2019. The cities’ appeal has moved to the 9th Circuit.

According to MM&C Telecommunications Attorney, Sean Hughes, “I suspect that this debate and accompanying legal and legislative maneuvering is going to continue. Between the Fed’s  actions to streamline 5G infrastructure development for the  consumer, which is nearly everyone (considering there are over 400 million wireless devices active in the United States), versus local government efforts to prevent or roll back Federal preemptions that are limiting local government review authority and citizen involvement over wireless development requests.“

The telecommunications land use attorneys at Miller, Miller & Canby are experienced in Maryland, D.C. and Virginia’s 5G Wireless and Small Cells Zoning. Our telecommunications, zoning attorneys and real estate attorneys are closely monitoring the impacts of the FCC order and the efforts of local legislatures to craft small cell legislation in order to be able to advise telecommunications carriers and potential landlords.

Sean P. Hughes
is an attorney in Miller, Miller & Canby’s Land Use practice group. His career spans more than two decades of focus in legal and wireless telecommunications and he has represented clients in land use and zoning matters throughout the Mid-Atlantic.  To learn more about the firm’s Land Use and Zoning practice, click here.

Cathy Borten
is an associate in Miller, Miller & Canby’s real estate practice group. She focuses in commercial real estate transactions and leasing, real estate litigation, land use and zoning and commercial financings and settlements. Cathy has over 10 years' experience in leasing, land use and zoning in the wireless telecommunications industry. Cathy also participated in the drafting of the Montgomery County and City of Gaithersburg original small cell ordinances. To learn more about the firm’s Real Estate practice, click here.
 





FCC Order on 5G and Small Cells Goes into Effect; Cities’ Appeal Goes to 9th Circuit Court


After the U.S. Court of Appeals for the 10th Circuit denied the cities’ request for a stay, the FCC’s Declaratory Ruling and Third Report and Order on small cell deployment went into effect on January 15, 2019.

Known as the September Small Cell Order, the item states that fees charged by a municipality for applications or rent must be limited to costs or they may be deemed as “effective prohibitions of service.” Aesthetic and undergrounding requirements may also be deemed to be a prohibition of service of small cell deployment. Additionally, it established new small cell shot clocks and codified previous ones, as well.
However, the courtroom drama is not over. In a second order, the 10th Circuit remanded the cities’ motion to review their petitions against the September Order back to the U.S. Court of Appeals for the 9th Circuit.

The 9th Circuit was already considering a lawsuit against the FCC’s Order banning municipal moratoria, which is basically part of the same rulemaking as the Small Cell Order. So with the transfer, both the moratoria and the Small Cell Order will be examined by the same court.
Which circuit rules on an appeal can have a big impact on the final outcome of the case. The 9th Circuit could turn out to be more supportive of the cities’ point of view as numerous 9th Circuits’ precedents were overruled by the FCC’s Small Cell Order.

Section 253 of the Telecommunications Act states that local regulations may not prohibit telecommunications services. The FCC Small Cell Order attempted to expand upon the definition of what would be deemed as a prohibition.

Another wrinkle in this case, the FCC currently does not have a lawyer working on this with the partial government shutdown. If it is not reopened in time, the Dept. of Justice will argue the case.

Congressional Involvement
The cities have also taken their fight against the FCC to Capitol Hill. Congresswoman Ana Eshoo introduced the “Accelerating Broadband Development by Empowering Local Communities Act of 2019,’’ on Jan. 14th to preserve the rights of state and local governments, essentially nullifying the September small cell order by the FCC: ‘‘Accelerating Wireless and Wireline Broadband Deployment by Removing Barriers to Infrastructure Investment.

Sean Hughes of Miller, Miller & Canby weighed in, “All interested parties are anxiously watching the Courts and legislative actions that will steer 5G infrastructure development.  Nearly all agree that the 5G state of the art technology is desired, the debate really exists about where the 5G equipment can be located, what it can look like and what local governments can charge as the related fees.”  

The telecommunications land use attorneys at Miller, Miller & Canby are experienced and entrenched in Maryland, D.C. and Virginia’s 5G Wireless and Small Cells Zoning. Our telecommunications, zoning attorneys and real estate attorneys are closely monitoring the impacts of the FCC order and the efforts of local legislatures to craft small cell legislation in order to be able to advise telecommunications carriers and potential landlords.

Sean P. Hughes
is an attorney in Miller, Miller & Canby’s Land Use practice group. His career spans more than two decades of focus in legal and wireless telecommunications and he has represented clients in land use and zoning matters throughout the Mid-Atlantic.  To learn more about the firm’s Land Use and Zoning practice, click here.

Cathy Borten
is an associate in Miller, Miller & Canby’s real estate practice group. She focuses in commercial real estate transactions and leasing, real estate litigation, land use and zoning and commercial financings and settlements. Cathy has over 10 years' experience in leasing, land use and zoning in the wireless telecommunications industry. Cathy also participated in the drafting of the Montgomery County and City of Gaithersburg original small cell ordinances. To learn more about the firm’s Real Estate practice, click here.
 





City of Gaithersburg Considers Changes to Small Cell Regulations


While some communities are re-inventing themselves as smart cities, many other small towns are busy deciphering what 5G means to them. Bringing 5G capabilities to an area means either new telecommunications towers or small cell deployment and all the financial implications of each.

The September FCC 5G and Small Cell Order is trying to help wireless companies speed deployment of 5G capabilities. The order states that local government cannot prohibit wireless telecommunication services. Local governments are trying to ensure their regulations do not run afoul of the FCC requirements and their regulations do not have the effect of prohibiting wireless telecommunication services to their residents.

Gaithersburg, Maryland City Council members discussed potential changes to small cell tower ordinances for local right-of-ways at a public hearing on January 7, 2019. New changes in FCC regulations and the telecommunications industry spurred on the proposed revisions that would allow developers to increase the size of cell tower equipment housing. Crown Castle and AT&T have been in communication with local government to discuss the possible changes. According to Deputy City Manager Dennis Enslinger, the current size regulation for cell tower equipment is 2.8 cubic feet, and with the changes it would increase to 12 cubic feet.

Council Member Ryan Spiegel will soon become president of the Maryland Municipal League and the City of Gaithersburg Council, where he has expressed the importance of this issue, and continuing to regulate small cell installation.

The public record on the potential ordinance changes will be open until January 31, and the Council will re-address the issue in mid-February.

The telecommunications land use attorneys at Miller, Miller & Canby are experienced and entrenched in Maryland, D.C. and Virginia’s 5G Wireless and Small Cells Zoning. Our telecommunications, zoning attorneys and real estate attorneys are closely monitoring the impacts of the FCC order and the efforts of local legislatures to craft small cell legislation in order to be able to advise telecommunications carriers and potential landlords. Click here to view all MM&C articles related to this topic.

Sean P. Hughes
is an attorney in Miller, Miller & Canby’s Land Use practice group. His career spans more than two decades of focus in legal and wireless telecommunications and he has represented clients in land use and zoning matters throughout the Mid-Atlantic.  To learn more about the firm’s Land Use and Zoning practice, click here.

Cathy Borten
is an associate in Miller, Miller & Canby’s real estate practice group. She focuses in commercial real estate transactions and leasing, real estate litigation, land use and zoning and commercial financings and settlements. Cathy has over 10 years' experience in leasing, land use and zoning in the wireless telecommunications industry. Cathy also participated in the drafting of the Montgomery County and City of Gaithersburg original small cell ordinances. To learn more about the firm’s Real Estate practice, click here.

 





Property Owners Have Until Early February to Appeal New Maryland Property Tax Assessments


At the end of December, the Maryland Department of Assessments and Taxation (SDAT) issued new Assessment Notices to owners of one-third of all commercial and residential properties in Maryland.  For instance, in Montgomery County, commercial properties in Silver Spring and Wheaton were reassessed.  In Frederick County, commercial properties in Urbana and parts of Ijamsville and Frederick were reassessed.  In Prince George’s County, commercial properties in Greenbelt, College Park, Hyattsville, Oxon Hill, Temple Hills and Riverdale were reassessed.

Property owners have 45 days from the date of the Assessment Notice to challenge these new assessments.  Based on the notices we have seen this cycle, the appeal deadline is February 11, 2019, although this could vary depending upon the notice date.  The “first-level” appeal takes place at the local Assessment Office.  If the assessor refuses to reduce the assessment, the owner may file a further appeal to the county’s Property Tax Assessment Appeals Board (PTAAB).   This Board will consider the evidence and issue a written decision, usually within two weeks.  If the property owner is still dissatisfied, another appeal may be filed to the Maryland Tax Court.

Miller, Miller & Canby has been challenging the assessments of various types of properties in Maryland for more than 30 years and has obtained substantial reductions in real property assessments for our clients.  Our litigation attorneys regularly represent clients before the local Assessment Office, PTAAB and the Maryland Tax Court.  We have successfully appealed the assessments on office buildings, retail stores, senior living centers, warehouses, industrial sites, casinos, apartment buildings and cemeteries.  Let us help you reduce your Maryland property assessments in 2019.

Michael Campbel
l is a partner in the litigation group at Miller, Miller & Canby.  In addition to trial and appellate advocacy, his practice focuses on real estate litigation and property tax assessment appeals.  Please feel free to contact Mr. Campbell at 301.762.5212 or send him an email for property tax guidance or to help reduce your commercial Maryland property tax assessment.  For more information about the firm’s Maryland property tax appeals practice and representative cases, click here.
 





Court Denies Stay Action on FCC Order to Speed Deployment of 5G and Small Cells


Many local governments were caught off guard by the September FCC Order to ease siting of small cells. The National League of Cities (NLC) and a group of local governments and associations brought their case to court and requested a stay for the looming January 14, 2019 implementation date.

Several localities sought judicial review of the order. A judicial panel consolidated the petitions and assigned them to the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Tenth Circuit. In addition to NLC, other parties joining the stay request were: the U.S. Conference of Mayors, National Association of Counties, National Association of Regional Councils, National Association of Towns and Townships and the National Association of Telecommunications Officers & Advisors.

NLC claims the FCC overreached when it voted to impose shot clocks for siting applications and cap application fees for municipalities and other localities concerning wireless infrastructure siting in public rights-of-way.

When evaluating a stay request, the Tenth Circuit Court considers whether the applicant’s arguments are likely to succeed, whether the party would be “irreparably injured” without a stay, and where the public interest lies.

The Tenth Circuit Court concluded the motion failed to satisfy these factors. As for the parties’ arguments that easing small siting rules would hurt property values and create traffic hazards, the court said even the NLC conceded the order, “does not compel any locality to authorize any particular facility,” states the decision signed by Donald Stockdale, Chief of the Wireless Telecommunications Bureau.
The FCC said it followed Congress’ lead by articulating, “specific standards for resolving concrete disputes over whether states’ or localities’ fees” are consistent with its rules. Most of the order is slated to become effective January 14, 2019. The order acknowledged that “some localities will require some time to establish and publish aesthetics standards,” and therefore the aesthetics standards will not take effect until 180 days after Federal Register publication.

According to the FCC Order, for localities that choose to impose aesthetic standards on small cell deployment, they must be:

  1. Reasonable;
  2. no more burdensome than those applied to other types of infrastructure deployments;
  3. objective; and
  4. published in advance.

The telecommunications land use attorneys at Miller, Miller & Canby are experienced and entrenched in Maryland, D.C. and Virginia’s 5G Wireless and Small Cells Zoning. Our telecommunications, zoning attorneys and real estate attorneys are closely monitoring the impacts of the FCC order and the efforts of local legislatures to craft small cell legislation in order to be able to advise telecommunications carriers and potential landlords.

Sean P. Hughes
is an attorney in Miller, Miller & Canby’s Land Use practice group. His career spans more than two decades of focus in legal and wireless telecommunications and he has represented clients in land use and zoning matters throughout the Mid-Atlantic.  To learn more about the firm’s Land Use and Zoning practice, click here.

Cathy Borten
is an associate in Miller, Miller & Canby’s real estate practice group. She focuses in commercial real estate transactions and leasing, real estate litigation, land use and zoning and commercial financings and settlements. Cathy has over 10 years' experience in leasing, land use and zoning in the wireless telecommunications industry. Cathy also participated in the drafting of the Montgomery County and City of Gaithersburg original small cell ordinances. To learn more about the firm’s Real Estate practice, click here.
 





December 2018 Legal News & Notes


The December 2018 issue of Miller, Miller & Canby's Legal News & Notes quarterly email newsletter announces five attorneys as Maryland Super Lawyers, Maryland Property Tax Appeals Approaching Deadline, IRS Gives the Green Light for Gifting, the Importance of a Condemnation Clause in Commercial Leases, Montgomery County Council Defers Action on Small Cell Tower Bill for 5G Infrastructure, Why It's Important to Have an Advanced Medical Directive, Lessons Learned from Actor Wesley Snipes Offer In Compromise Case with the IRS and much more.  Click here to view newsletter.





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